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Barry Pateman

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Growing up in Yorkshire Barry idolised the likes of Jimmy Binks, Doug Padgett, Phil Sharpe, Freddie Truman and Vic Wilson. He played cricket and avidly read cricket books. A major influence in his thinking about cricket was John Arlott.- both for Arlott’s obvious love of the game’s hard working professionals from the county circuit, as well as its stars, and Arlott’s belief that cricket could never exist in a vacuum and should not ignore the world beyond the gates of the cricket ground. This has meant Barry often being disappointed but his love for the game has never wavered, if his love for cricket commentators has. He worked as an archivist, editor, researcher and teacher at UC Berkeley in California before arriving in New Zealand in 2012. For the last three years he has volunteered at the NZ Cricket Museum spending much of his time cataloguing and arranging the Library there. He helped research the Museum’s tribute to some of the New Zealand representative players who took part in World War One and hopes to extend that research. He also writes the occasional blog for the Museum and can often be found muttering to himself in the back office as he catalogues some book that is meant to be “funny.” One day he hopes to write an appreciation of all the trees that have been slaughtered to produce books on “the humour of cricket”.
Harry Graham

Review: Harry Graham, The Little Dasher

  In his poem, Gerontion, TS Eliot writes “History has many cunning passages” and the truth of that can be seen if we apply it to the history of writing on cricket. Especially when...
Tingling Catch

The Poetry of Cricket: Part Two

This is a fascinating anthology that has been very well put together by Mark Pirie. It’s divided into various categories and nearly all of them contain poetry of considerable merit and reflect an...
Bangladesh Cricket Museum

A Little Bit Of Pride Among The Memories

The first Test of 2017's series between the BLACKCAPS and Bangladesh showcased all of Test cricket's nuances. It started with talk of pitch condition and went through weather interruptions, centuries, a mammoth partnership, a...

The Poetry Of Cricket: Part One

I think it is true to say that, of all our sports, it is cricket that is the most literary. The library at the New Zealand Cricket Museum has many literary anthologies based...
Pro, An English Tragedy

Review: Pro, An English Tragedy

Arthur Douglas Bruce Hamilton (1900-1974) is best known as a crime and thriller writer. His novels such as The Brighton Murder Trial¹ and Traitor’s Way² are tautly written and atmospheric works that have somehow been overlooked...

Review: The Team That Never Played

The Wahine tragedy of 1968 had a shuddering effect on New Zealand. It was one of those events where people alive at the time can clearly remember what they were doing when they...